Higher Intake of Fruit, but Not Vegetables or Fiber, at Baseline Is Associated with Lower Risk of Becoming Overweight or Obese in Middle-Aged and Older Women of Normal BMI at Baseline.



The Journal of nutrition, 2015; 145 (5) doi:10.3945/jn.114.199158

Authors: Rautiainen Susanne, Wang Lu, Lee I-Min, Manson JoAnn E, Buring Julie E et al.(1)

Affiliation: Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Karolinska Institute Stockholm, Sweden; Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States (show more (5))

Sample size: 146

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Fruit, vegetable, and dietary fiber intake have been associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, little is known about their role in obesity prevention.
OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to investigate whether intake of fruits, vegetables, and dietary fiber is associated with weight change and the risk of becoming overweight and obese.
METHODS: We studied 18,146 women aged ≥45 y from the Women's Health Study free of CVD and cancer with an initial body mass index (BMI) of 18.5 to <25 kg/m². Fruit, vegetable, and dietary fiber intakes were assessed at baseline through a 131-item food-frequency questionnaire, along with obesity-related risk factors. Women self-reported body weight on annual questionnaires.
RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 15.9 y, 8125 women became overweight or obese (BMI ≥25 kg/m²). Intakes of total fruits and vegetables, fruits, and dietary fiber were not associated with the longitudinal changes in body weight, whereas higher vegetable intake was associated with greater weight gain (P-trend: 0.02). In multivariable analyses, controlling for total energy intake and physical activity along with other lifestyle, clinical, and dietary factors, women in the highest vs. lowest quintile of fruit intake had an HR of 0.87 (95% CI: 0.80, 0.94; P-trend: 0.01) of becoming overweight or obese. No association was observed for vegetable or dietary fiber intake. The association between fruit intake and risk of becoming overweight or obese was modified by baseline BMI (P-interaction: <0.0001) where the strongest inverse association was observed among women with a BMI <23 kg/m² (HR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.71, 0.94).
CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that greater baseline intake of fruit, but not vegetables or fiber, by middle-aged and older women with a normal BMI at baseline is associated with lower risk of becoming overweight or obese.














Related patents

Loading...

Map of newest papers for: intake overweight

The top research papers for the subject are placed on the map. Studies form clusters based on semantic relation.

Size of the point represents relevance of the paper.

You can pan and zoom the graph using mouse and mouse wheel.

Right click on the paper to:

  • a) open the paper
  • b) to open first author’s resume page.

Left click on keyword to add it to search.

Sign up to create your own map!