Anthropometric measures, body mass index, and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan).



Archives of internal medicine, 2010; 170 (9) doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2010.63

Authors: Arslan Alan A, Helzlsouer Kathy J, Kooperberg Charles, Shu Xiao-Ou, Steplowski Emily et al.(46)

Affiliation: New York University School of Medicine, 10016, NY, United States

Sample size: 2209

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Obesity has been proposed as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer.
METHODS: Pooled data were analyzed from the National Cancer Institute Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) to study the association between prediagnostic anthropometric measures and risk of pancreatic cancer. PanScan applied a nested case-control study design and included 2170 cases and 2209 control subjects. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression for cohort-specific quartiles of body mass index (BMI [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]), weight, height, waist circumference, and waist to hip ratio as well as conventional BMI categories (underweight, <18.5; normal weight, 18.5-24.9; overweight, 25.0-29.9; obese, 30.0-34.9; and severely obese, > or = 35.0). Models were adjusted for potential confounders.
RESULTS: In all of the participants, a positive association between increasing BMI and risk of pancreatic cancer was observed (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest BMI quartile, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.12-1.58; P(trend) < .001). In men, the adjusted OR for pancreatic cancer for the highest vs lowest quartile of BMI was 1.33 (95% CI, 1.04-1.69; P(trend) < .03), and in women it was 1.34 (95% CI, 1.05-1.70; P(trend) = .01). Increased waist to hip ratio was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in women (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest quartile, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.31-2.69; P(trend) = .003) but less so in men.
CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide strong support for a positive association between BMI and pancreatic cancer risk. In addition, centralized fat distribution may increase pancreatic cancer risk, especially in women.














Related patents

Loading...

Map of newest papers for: pancreatic cancer

The top research papers for the subject are placed on the map. Studies form clusters based on semantic relation.

Size of the point represents relevance of the paper.

You can pan and zoom the graph using mouse and mouse wheel.

Right click on the paper to:

  • a) open the paper
  • b) to open first author’s resume page.

Left click on keyword to add it to search.

Sign up to create your own map!